Danio kyathit

Danio kyathit has an elongated body with a yellow to orange colourations. Over the sides of the body run 5 to 7 stripes. The stripes can either be dotted or normal full lines. These bar run from the gills all over the body. The specimens with full lines are often mistaken for Zebra Danios (Danio rerio).

Description

Danio kyathit

Since the original description of Danio kyathit by F. Fang in 1998, no new names have emerged for this species. Therefore, it is still referred to as Danio kyathit.

Description

Danio kyathit has an elongated body with a yellow to orange colourations. Over the sides of the body run 5 to 7 stripes. The stripes can either be dotted or normal full lines. These bar run from the gills all over the body. The specimens with full lines are often mistaken for Zebra Danios (Danio rerio). A Zebra Danio has, however, colourless fins whereas Danio kyathit has an orange bar at the edges of the fins.
In addition to the orange bar, the anal fin has one or two additional orange stripes over the fin. The area between these orange lines is blue to black.
It can be hard to differentiate both sexes. Females are often rounder bellied whereas males have a more pronounced colouration. This difference is best observed when the fish are ready to mate. In that case, males will display their best colours whereas the bellies of the females will be filled with eggs.

Distribution and Habitat

Danio kyathit has a relatively small habitat. It is found near the city of Myitkyina in Kachin state in Myanmar (Burma). Here can it be caught in tributaries of the Irrawaddy.
The natural habitat exists of streams and rivers with a strong current. The water in these streams ranges from clear white water to blackwater. The rivers flow through forests that mainly exist of bamboo. Mud and pebbles vorm the substrate of these streams.
Due to the limited distribution of Danio kyathit, it is classified by the IUCN as near threatened.

Diet

In their natural habitat, Danio kyathit feeds on insects and their larvae. It is, however, not very picky in an aquarium. It will accept fabricated, frozen and live food. These fish accept new types of food rather quickly.

The Aquarium

The aquarium should be decorated using enough decorations. However, do also provide enough open space for the fish to be able to swim around. Since Danio kyathit lives in streams and rivers with a strong current, a powerful filter is recommended. When the lights are dimmed, the fish will display their colours better. This can be achieved by either dimming the lights themselves or provide plants at the surface. A dark substrate would enhance the colours even further.
Danio kyathit is a peaceful species. They will not chase other fish or hurt them intentionally. Do keep in mind that these fish can jump out of an aquarium. Therefore, a well closed lid should be placed on the tank.

Breeding

When the fish are healthy, Danio kyathit will not be hard to breed. They are often seen spawning in community tanks. In heavily planted tanks with a low amount of fishes, some eggs and fry may survive. However, to enhance the yield, a separate breeding aquarium needs to be prepared.

This breeding aquarium should be decorated in such a way that the fish cannot eat their own eggs easily. This can be done by planting the aquarium with a lot of plants. Javafern and aquatic mosses are especially useful for this purpose. Instead of plants, specially crafted spawning mops can be placed. Another solution is to create a substrate of marbles. The eggs will fall between the marbles where they cannot be reached by the adults.

To stimulate the Danios into breeding, the pH should be set at 7. In addition, the water temperature should be increased to 24-26 °C. A powerful filter in the tank will create the current that these fish need. If the tank, which should be halfway filled, is topped up with slightly cooler water, the fish will start spawning. Since the fish will scatter their eggs in different batches, don not catch the adults immediately when they stop laying their eggs. It is likely that they will resume after a while. Once all the eggs are laid, the parents can be captured.

The eggs of Danio kyathit will need 24 to 36 hours to hatch. A few days after hatching, the fry will start to swim freely throughout the aquarium. At this point, the fry can be fed with artemia nauplia or microscopic factory food.

References

Author
Rick

Translated
R.Eltingh

Copyright foto’s
Choy Heng Wah
Gerry Verrier

 

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